Little Book of Confusables

Slay and sleigh: easy ways to remember the difference

SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

SLAY and SLEIGH are less common than many of the #confusable words described here, but are still worth covering. The fact that the two words are homophones – meaning they sound the same – means they can be mixed up.

Let’s look at the difference between SLAY and SLEIGH.

When to use slay

SLAY is a verb with two meanings.

It can mean to brutally kill, like this:

“Saint George set out to slay the dragon.”

It can also mean to amuse someone greatly, like this:

“You slay me!”

When to use sleigh

SLEIGH is a noun, meaning an old-fashioned sledge, often pulled by reindeer.

To help you remember which spelling you need, remember that both sleigh and reindeer contain ei.

For example:

“Santa’s sleigh is pulled by reindeer.”

I hope this helps you to remember the difference between slay and sleigh. Feel free to share your tips if you’ve a different way to remember the difference.

SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

Coming soon: The Little Book of Confusables

Wouldn’t you love a handy guide to those tricksy spellings that trip you up and make you look bad? Words like PRACTICE and PRACTISE, AFFECT and EFFECT, or IMPLY and INFER.

The Little Book of Confusables shares simple, memorable spelling tips and examples for more than 500 of the words you find most confusing. Supercharge your vocabulary and avoid embarrassing mistakes! Sign up to my monthly newsletter for updates.