Little Book of Confusables

Brake vs break: do you know the difference?

BRAKE vs BREAK: which is which? Tips and tricks to remember the difference

BRAKE and BREAK are easy to confuse – especially if you’re new to the English language. The fact that the two words sound the same – they’re homophones – means people commonly mix them up.

Here are my simple spelling tips to remember the difference between BRAKE and BREAK.

BREAK can be both a noun and a verb.

As a noun, BREAK means time out.

“It’s time for your lunch BREAK

“Let’s take a BREAK

As a verb, BREAK means damage or destroy.

“I dropped my phone but luckily it didn’t BREAK.”

BRAKE can be both a noun and a verb.

As a noun, a BRAKE is the stopping pedal in a car or other vehicle.

As a verb, BRAKE means to slow down or stop – for example, a car.

Noun: “Remember to use the BRAKE to stop the car in good time.”

Verb: “I had to BRAKE hard to avoid the oncoming cyclist.”

Confusables: break vs brake. Language and spelling tips from copywriter Sarah Townsend Editorial

Confusables: break vs brake. Language and spelling tips from copywriter Sarah Townsend Editorial

Coming soon: The Little Book of Confusables

Wouldn’t you love a handy guide to those tricksy spellings that trip you up and make you look bad? Words like PRACTICE and PRACTISE, AFFECT and EFFECT, or IMPLY and INFER.

The Little Book of Confusables shares simple, memorable spelling tips and examples for more than 500 of the words you find most confusing. Supercharge your vocabulary and avoid embarrassing mistakes! Sign up to my monthly newsletter for updates.