Slay and sleigh: easy ways to remember the difference

SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

SLAY and SLEIGH are less common than many of the #confusable words described here, but are still worth covering. The fact that the two words are homophones – meaning they sound the same – means they can be mixed up.

Let’s look at the difference between SLAY and SLEIGH.

When to use slay

SLAY is a verb with two meanings.

It can mean to brutally kill, like this:

“Saint George set out to slay the dragon.”

It can also mean to amuse someone greatly, like this:

“You slay me!”

When to use sleigh

SLEIGH is a noun, meaning an old-fashioned sledge, often pulled by reindeer.

To help you remember which spelling you need, remember that both sleigh and reindeer contain ei.

For example:

“Santa’s sleigh is pulled by reindeer.”

I hope this helps you to remember the difference between slay and sleigh. Feel free to share your tips if you’ve a different way to remember the difference.

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SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

SLAY and SLEIGH: which is which? Learn the difference between these easy to confuse words.

 

There’ll vs they’ll: simple tips to help you remember

THERE’LL vs THEY’LL: which is which? Learn the difference

THERE’LL and THEY’LL are often confused but remembering the difference is easy when you know how. These simple tips will help you decide which word you need.

When to use there’ll

THERE’LL is a contraction of the words there + will = THERE’LL

The apostrophe in the word there’ll shows that there are letters missing – in this case, and i.

Here are a couple of examples of the word there’ll used in a sentence:

There’ll be trouble!” = “There will be trouble!”

There’ll be blue birds over the white cliffs of Dover” = “There will be blue birds over the white cliffs of Dover”

When to use they’ll

THEY’LL is a contraction of the words they + will = they’ll.

It is the short version of:

Here’s how they’ll is used in a sentence:

They’ll be late!” = “They will be late!”

They’ll need a lie-in after their late night” = “They’ll need a lie-in after their late night”

In a nutshell, to remember the difference between there’ll and they’ll, start by writing the contraction in full, to see if you mean there or they.

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THERE'LL vs THEY'LL – simple tips to remember the difference

THERE’LL and THEY’LL – simple tips to remember the difference

Bear vs bare: spelling tips to help you learn the difference

The words BEAR and BARE are easy to confuse – particularly when you’re using the expression bear with me, when there’s a world of a difference in meaning! This is one you really don’t want to get wrong!

Here are my simple tips to remember the difference between BEAR and BARE.

When to use bear

BEAR can be a noun or a verb.

As a verb, it means to carry or endure. You can use it in a sentence like this:

“Please bear with me for a moment.”

As a noun, bear is a large animal.

For example:

“Winnie-the-Pooh is a famous bear.”

When to use bare

BARE can be a verb or an adjective.

As a verb, bare means to expose, like this:

“I will bare my soul and be completely honest.”

As an adjective, bare means exposed, like this:

“The gorilla beat his bare chest.”

Now you know the difference between bear and bare you can see that the phrases “bear with me” (please be patient) and “bare with me” (let’s get naked) should never be mixed up! I hope these tips help you to remember the difference between these commonly confused spellings in the future.

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BARE vs BEAR: simple tips to remember the difference

BARE vs BEAR: simple tips to remember the difference

Etymology vs entomology: do you know the difference?

ETYMOLOGY vs ENTOMOLOGY: simple tips to remember the difference between these similar-sounding words.

When to use etymology

ETYMOLOGY is the study of the origins of words.

Here’s an example of the word etymology in a sentence:

“Jack had always been fascinated by the history of words. He loved etymology.”

When to use entomology

ENTOMOLOGY is the study of insects.

To help you remember the difference between these similar-sounding words, ou might find it helpful to think of an insect nibbling away at a tomato plant: tomato = entomology.

Alternatively, an ant is an insect, and entomology has a similar beginning. 

Here’s an example of the word entomology in a sentence:

“I decided to study entomology after enjoying A-level biology.”

Bonus fact

The suffix –logy means ‘the study of’. So, any time you see a word ending in this way, you’ll know it relates to the study of something.

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ETYMOLOGY vs ENTOMOLOGY: learn the difference between these similar-sounding words.

ETYMOLOGY vs ENTOMOLOGY: learn the difference between these similar-sounding words.